Friday, October 24, 2014

Perfect Girl by Michele Gorman Book Trailer


Today, we are featuring the book trailer of Perfect Girl by Michele Gorman. Enjoy!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Michele Gorman is the author of several best-selling romantic comedies including The Curvy Girls Club, Single in the City and Bella Summer Takes a Chance. Born and raised in the US, Michele now lives in London and is overly fond of most baked goods, long naps, and a cold glass of rosé.

Find Michele at:

Twitter: @MicheleGormanUK

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MicheleGormanBooks
ABOUT THE BOOK:

Cinderella meets Falling Down in this wickedly funny tale about having it all 
Carol is perfect… at least that’s what everyone thinks. In reality she’s sinking fast – her family treats her like their personal assistant and her boyfriend is so busy with work that he’s got her single-handedly running their relationship. Not that her job is any easier. As the only woman on the bank’s trading floor she spends twelve-hour days trying not to get sworn at or felt up by colleagues who put the "W" in banker.

How long can she go on pleasing everyone else before she snaps and loses it all?

With humour and empathy, Perfect Girl lays bare the balancing act that working women face in a man's world


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Amazon US: http://amzn.to/YdCAuW
Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/WfGNN4


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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Review: Daisy to the Rescue: True Stories of Daring Dogs, Paramedic Parrots, and Other Animal Heroes by Jeff Campbell


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Who rescued who? This popular animal-shelter bumper sticker captures an enduring emotional truth: With their love and companionship, animals of all species save our lives every day. But sometimes, to our utter amazement and everlasting gratitude, animals literally save our lives, and this heartwarming book collects over 50 real-life stories of animals rescuing people, in which the actions of animals have meant the difference between life and death.
Today, scientists vigorously debate questions regarding the sentience, intelligence, and emotions of animals. In particular, they want to know whether animals share with humans the highest emotions of empathy, compassion, and altruism. This book also poses these questions for readers to consider, and using current research on animal minds and emotions, it examines these extreme life-saving situations for possible evidence. Where appropriate, skepticism and doubt surrounding particular stories is included, but gathered together, these anecdotes make a compelling case for the presence of altruism in animals.
Thus, this book provides dramatic, thrilling, and moving stories that convey a hopeful message about our world. But these stories also provide startling evidence of the mental and emotional capacities of animals, those being we share the world with.

MY TAKE:
While I like animals in general, I've never felt the desire to own a pet until I read this book.

In Daisy to the Rescue:  True Stories of Daring Dogs, Paramedic Parrots, and Other Animal Heroes, we get to learn the stories of some remarkable animals, both domesticated and wild, who have saved the lives of humans in one way or another.

Before the start of each story, there is a summary containing the animal's name (if it has one), its species, the date of the rescue, location, situation, who was saved, and what level of fame the animal achieved for its actions.

Some of the stories in the book sounded familiar. One, in particular, the story of Kabang the hero dog, is very familiar to me since I live in the Philippines. It happened far from the capital megacity of Metro Manila, though, so all of my knowledge comes from reading national broadsheets and articles on the internet. Kabang's heroics was a pretty big story here, so I can say at the very least that in terms of fame meter, yes, Kabang was accurately rated as a hall-of-famer.

What differentiates this book from other books about animal heroics is that it sees these stories with a scientific eye. There are quotes from scientists and it is often pointed out and discussed if the animal's act was done out of compassion or selfishness or they were doing it for some other reason entirely.

Overall, this was a really good book, and if you've always hated the thought of having pets, you might reconsider after this one. Take note, though, that if your e-reader slows down when it reads books with lots of pictures, you would be better off with a physical copy of the book.

Thanks to NetGalley and Zest Books for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. The stories are interesting and relatively current.
  2. The stories are well-researched.
  3. It tries to shed light on the science behind the animals' actions. 

THE BAD:

  1. If you'd rather read the stories instead of thinking about the science behind it, you may find some parts boring. 

READ IT IF:

  1. You consider yourself an animal lover.
  2. You want to own a pet but your parents are against it.
  3. You're thinking of getting a pet. 

RATING:
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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Review: The Junkyard Bot:Robots Rule, Book 1 by C. J. Richards


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Worker robots keep the high-tech town of Terabyte Heights humming, but ten-year-old George Gearing is the only one who has a robot for a best friend. When his scrappy but beloved pal Jackbot is hit by a car, the whiz kid re-engineers him with fancy parts from state-of-the-art TinkerTech Laboratories. Jackbot’s astounding new skills far exceed anything George—or even TinkerTech’s head of robotics—could ever have imagined. Will the villainous Dr. Micron destroy the whole town to see his tech-driven dream realized? Not if George can help it . . .
MY TAKE:
I like shows and books showing precocious kids so I figured I would like this one too.

In The Junkyard Bot, George is a young boy with a talent for robotics. His best friend is a shabby robot named Jackbot. When he ends up having to fix Jackbot with parts from TinkerTech's workshop, he sets off a chain of events that could spell doom for his town.

If Jimmy Neutron had been more modest or didn't have the means to fund his experiments and projects, I think he would have been exactly like George. Because George isn't privileged, he has remained humble despite his talents. I think that's part of the reason why it's so easy to cheer for him. He's a good kid and a brilliant, out-of-the-box thinker.

Jackbot, on the other hand, was nice at first but once he developed a personality, well, he got a bit more annoying, but at least he also became more interesting. His cockiness was also probably why I imagined him with C3P0's voice.

There were some exciting parts in the book, and there were several plot twists as well. Some of the plot twists are easy enough to predict, but there were a few that came as a surprise too.
Thanks to NetGalley and HMH Books for Young Readers for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. Jackbot and George have a sweet relationship.
  2. George is a likable character.
  3. There are plenty of interesting things going on. 

THE BAD:

  1. There were some plot twists that weren't as surprising as they could have been. 

READ IT IF:

  1. You or your child like robotics.
  2. You like books wherein the protagonist has a solid back-up crew.
  3. You've always wanted your own robot. 

RATING:
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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Most had their own personal robots with them - tall, gleaming creations, some on wheels, some on legs, some with flashing displays on their chest panels.

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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Review: Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis by Alexis Coe


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
In 1892, every major newspaper in America was obsessed with a teenage murderess, but it wasn't her crime that shocked the nation – it was her motivation, which was dismissed as insane far before the case ever came to trial.
Nineteen-year-old Alice Mitchell loved Freda Ward, but if she couldn't marry her seventeen-year-old fiancé, no one could. When Freda’s sister discovered their love letters, she exposed the couple’s plan to elope in Memphis and live in St. Louis, where Alice would pass as a man support them.
Intimate female friendships were commonplace at the turn-of-the-century, but forty years before the term "lesbian" would emerge, same-sex love was virtually unknown in America. Alice and Freda’s scheme was therefore dismissed as a schoolgirl fantasy taken too far. The fathers were to be kept out of this affair entirely, and yet, just to be sure, the two families’ matriarchs handed down a definitive sentence: Alice and Freda were never to speak again.
Freda adjusted to this fate with an ease that stunned Alice, leaving her heartbroken and isolated. Her desperation grew with each unanswered letter – and her father’s razor soon went missing.
On January 25th, Alice slashed her ex-fiancé’s throat, but a crowd formed before she could take her own life. Her same-sex love was deemed insane by her own father that very night, and every expert in the state of Tennessee agreed with the retired businessman: this kind of perversion was dangerous and incurable. As the courtroom was expanded to accommodate national and local interest, Alice spent months in jail – including the night the KKK lynched three of her fellow prisoners, a case that captured the attention of Memphian Ida B. Wells.
Alice's lunacy inquisition was over in just 10 days. She was sentenced to an asylum, where she died under mysterious circumstances a few years later.
Alice + Freda Forever tells tragic, real-life love story with the aid of over 100 illustrated newspaper clippings, love letters, legal correspondence, and re-imagined courtroom scenes. Their names may not be familiar now, but Alice and Freda’s story became a national case study for same-sex love, perpetuated as strange and dangerous in a wide-array of literature, from medical texts to works of fiction. This sensational crime occurred well over a hundred years ago, but this world will prove sadly familiar to the modern reader.

MY TAKE:
I'm not sure exactly what it was that drew me to this book, but I'm glad I gave it a try.

In Alice + Freda Forever, readers learn about the love story of Alice Mitchell and Freda Ward, as well as the aftermath of Alice's shocking decision to eliminate Freda.

This book reads a bit like a crime documentary in book form. That is, we get flashbacks of important moments and details of Alice and Freda's romance, as well as what happened in the courtroom afterward. Interwoven through the narrative where Alice and Freda's letters, some articles and other things, so readers get to see the whole affair through almost omniscient eyes.

From what I can tell from the story, Alice and Freda's relationship was quite toxic. Alice was possessive and Freda was like Maureen from Rent, flirtatious and loved attention. The way the book was written, as well as the way it was presented, really allowed me to feel the excitement and other emotions that the participants in the story felt.

Aside from Alice and Freda's story, we also get a glimpse of life in Victorian-era America. Let me tell you, it made me very angry. During that time, racism and sexism were very much alive. There were moments when I felt like yelling at the men in the story that they were idiots. I'm so happy that I live in a world that is striving to make things better for everyone.

Thanks to NetGalley and Zest Books for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. The book is well-researched.
  2. The story is well-written.
  3. You get to see what life is like in Victorian-era and how that played into the events in the book.

THE BAD:

  1. The longer letters written using a handwritten font made me feel a little cross-eyed as I tried to read it.

READ IT IF:

  1. You like watching documentaries.
  2. You hate racism and sexism.
  3. You like reading about life way back when. 

RATING:
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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

In My Mailbox


In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:



The Junkyard Bot: Robots Rule, Book 1 by C. J. Richards
Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis by Alexis Coe
Daisy to the Rescue: True Stories of Daring Dogs, Paramedic Parrots, and Other Animal Heroes by Jeff Campbell
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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Review: The Complete Adventures of Johnny Mutton by James Proimos


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
It's hard being the only sheep in class. Even so, Johnny Mutton refuses to follow the herd. His sweet sense of humor, sheer delight in life's simple pleasures, and unexpected triumphs are the stuff of legend. Whatever the adventure, Johnny's incredible zest for all that is ordinary showcases why he's so him--and why no one can resist his zany charm. Johnny will tickle your funny bone--and leave you wondering just what he'll think of next.
Fans of Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants will have a new laugh-aloud hero to root for in this collection full of zany illustrations, jokes, and wild fun.
MY TAKE:
I thought Captain Underpants was an entertaining book, so after reading the blurb for this book, I decided to give Johnny Mutton a try.

In The Complete Adventures of Johnny Mutton, readers get to know Johnny, a young lamb who was raised by a human, as well as his momma, his friend Gloria, and his nemesis Mandy.

The book is a compilation of three Johnny Mutton books, so there's plenty here to read.

The comparison to Captain Underpants is valid in a way. It has the same, silly humor and feel to it, but Johnny is nicer and sweeter than the main characters in Captain Underpants. Johnny is a pretty endearing character and even when he's being naughty and doing things that would annoy you in real life, on paper, it's actually quite amusing. I think that's why Johnny is such an easy character to cheer for.

Kids will love Johnny's antics, but personally, aside from the interesting variations in panel sizes, layout and presentation, I liked the Where Are They Now part.

The illustrations style wasn't for me, though, but I did like that the ARC I received was in full color.

Thanks to NetGalley and HMH Books for Young Readers for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. Johnny is a likable character.
  2. The stories are funny, but some of them have good lessons for kids too.
  3. There are plenty of stories to read.

THE BAD:

  1. The illustration style might not appeal to everyone.

READ IT IF:

  1. You like books with silly humor.
  2. You like books like Captain Underpants.
  3. Your child likes reading comic books.

RATING:
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SOUNDS INTERESTING?
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Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.
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