Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!
It didn't take long for word to circulate that the Pirate Namir yi Nadir was in port and that he was signing up men for his new crew.
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, April 29, 2013

Review: Beyond the Solar System Exploring Galaxies, Black Holes, Alien Planets, and More; A History with 21 Activities by Mary Kay Carson


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Humans have gazed into the night sky for thousands of years and wondered, What are those twinkling lights? Though the sun, moon, and planets moved across the background of stars, the stars themselves appeared immovable, forever fixed in constellations. Only when astronomers began taking a closer look did anyone realize what a fascinating, ever-changing universe lies beyond our solar system—red giant and white dwarf stars, spiral galaxies, wispy nebulae, black holes, and much more.
            In Beyond the Solar System, author Mary Kay Carson traces the evolution of humankind’s astronomical knowledge, from the realization that we are not at the center of the universe to recent telescopic proof of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system. In addition to its engaging history, this book contains 21 hands-on projects to further explore the subjects discussed. Readers will build a three-dimensional representation of the constellation Orion, model the warping of space-time caused by a black hole, see how the universe expands using an inflating balloon, and construct a reflecting telescope out of a makeup mirror and a magnifying glass. Beyond the Solar System also includes minibiographies of famous astronomers, a time line of major scientific discoveries, a suggested reading list, a glossary of technical terms, and a list of websites for further exploration.

MY TAKE:
I've always found space to be a fascinating topic, so I thought I would give this book a try.

In Beyond the Solar System, kids can learn about space and the history of space exploration. There are also activities they can try, such as locating the North Star using the Big Dipper as a reference point.

Since this book was listed as children's nonfiction, and there were activities for children to do, I expected the coverage and the language to be simple. I was surprised to see that it was actually very comprehensive. The language and the text-heaviness of the book might be more suited to older kids, such as middle schoolers and maybe even high school students.

That said, I thought that the book's topics were very interesting and it talked about a lot of things that those with only a casual knowledge of astronomy might not be aware of. Younger kids may get bored easily, though, unless they are very interested in astronomy.

Thanks to NetGalley and Chicago Review Press for the e-ARC. Publication date of Beyond the Solar System Exploring Galaxies, Black Holes, Alien Planets, and More; A History with 21 Activities is on June 1, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. It's comprehensive.
  2. The activities are fun and can mostly be done by kids on their own.
  3. The layout and pictures prevent the book from becoming monotonous.

THE BAD:

  1. There's a lot of text to read through.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
This deep curiosity was what made Einstein one of the greatest scientists of all time.
READ IT IF:

  1. Your child likes astronomy.
  2. You are an astronomy buff.
  3. You like trivia.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?





Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

In My Mailbox



In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:




The Pirate's Wish by Cassandra Rose Clarke
Ink The Paper Gods Book One by Amanda Sun
Beyond the Solar System Exploring Galaxies, Black Holes, Alien Planets, and More; A History with 21 Activities by Mary Kay Carson
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Review: Twerp by Mark Goldblatt


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:



A good book about a bad deed. Think Wonder meets Stand by Me in this warm and accessible literary middle-grade novel. Perfect for fans of Jerry Spinelli, Jennifer L. Holm, and Rebecca Stead.
     It's not like I meant for Danley to get hurt. . . .
     Julian Twerski isn't a bully. He's just made a big mistake. So when he returns to school after a weeklong suspension, his English teacher offers him a deal: if he keeps a journal and writes about the incident that got him and his friends suspended, he can get out of writing a report on Shakespeare. Julian jumps at the chance. And so begins his account of life in sixth grade--blowing up homemade fireworks, writing a love letter for his best friend (with disastrous results), and worrying whether he's still the fastest kid in school. Lurking in the background, though, is the one story he can't bring himself to tell, the one story his teacher most wants to hear.
     Inspired by Mark Goldblatt's own childhood growing up in 1960s Queens, Twerp shines with powerful writing that will have readers laughing and crying right along with these flawed but unforgettable characters.



MY TAKE:
Based on the blurb, I really thought that I would enjoy this book.

In Twerp, we get to read about different stories from Julian Twerski's life. The stories are part of a book that he's writing in order to get out of writing about Shakespeare.

For some strange reason, I found this book quite boring. There were parts that I enjoyed, of course, but there were also parts which I would skim or skip over. Perhaps it was because the stories didn't all flow into one continuous story or maybe it was because I found the female love interest to be self-absorbed and slightly nuts. I guess I'm not really the target audience for this book.

The parts that I liked in this book were those that were about Julian and his friends. When the focus is on their group and not just on Julian or the love interest, that's when this book really shines. If books about the antics of young boys are your thing, you might enjoy this.

Thanks to NetGalley and Random House BFYR for the e-ARC. Publication date of Twerp is on May 28, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. The interaction between Julian and his friends feel genuine.
  2. There are some funny stories here.
  3. Julian sounds like your typical teenage boy.

THE BAD:

  1. There are parts which may be boring to some readers.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Right then, Mr. Rifkin walked over with a big plate of hamburgers and hot dogs.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like buddy movies.
  2. You are looking for a book narrated by a male protagonist.
  3. You like reading about the adventures of young boys.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Friday, April 26, 2013

Review: Storm by Evan Angler


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

In a future United States under the power of a charismatic leader, everyone gets the Mark at age thirteen. The Mark lets citizen shop, go to school, and even get medical care—without it, you are on your own. Few refuse to get the Mark. Those who do . . . disappear.
Logan Langly went in to get his Mark, but he backed out at the last minute. Ever since, he’s been on the run from government agents and on a quest to find his sister Lily, who disappeared when she went to get her Mark five years earlier. His journey leads him to befriend the Dust, a vast network of Markless individuals who dissent against the iron-grip rule of the government. Along the way to the capital to find Lily, the Dust receive some startling information from the Markless community, opening their eyes to the message of Christianity and warning that humanity is now entering the End of Days.
In Storm, Logan and his friends are the leaders of the Markless revolution. But while some Markless are fighting Chancellor Cylis’ army, the Dust is busy trying to find a cure for a horrible epidemic sweeping through the Marked. And it's difficult for them to know who to trust, especially when they aren't sure if Logan's sister Lily, one of the commanders in Cylis' army, is on their side or not. And all across the nation—and the world—the weather has become less stable and a storm is brewing that bigger than any of them could have ever imagined.

MY TAKE:
I originally thought that this was the final book in a trilogy, but after reading through the book, I'm glad that there are more stories to come.

In Storm, Logan and his friends continue their fight against the Markless. The roles of previously minor characters now come into focus, but who is on whose side anyway?

This book has non-stop action and I enjoyed it from start to finish. Since it's been a while since I read the second book, it took awhile for me to remember who was whom, but after that, everything went smoothly.

We get to learn more about the leaders General Lamson and Cylis, the disease that affects Marked instead of Markless, and the drought that the country is experiencing. While learning about the disease and the other stuff was interesting, my favorite part of the book were the plot twists. You think this person is good but he's not or this person is bad but he's not. You can't really tell which is which, and that makes this book so interesting.

Unlike the first two books which were pretty subtle with its Christian references and parallels, this book is more open than that. The Bible is mentioned several times, several characters pray, and there are several events that will seem very familiar if you're a Christian or you've seen documentaries about Jesus' life.

One thing I didn't like about this book was the sort of breaking of the fourth wall, wherein the characters come across the first books in the series. I guess some people might like that, but I find it a little offputting and it takes me out of the moment.

Thanks to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson for the e-ARC. Publication date of Storm is on May 7, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. It's action-packed.
  2. The plot twists will surprise you.
  3. Minor characters get bigger parts.

THE BAD:

  1. Mentions about the first books in the series can be off-putting for some.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Dane looked around, noticing the way the land across the valley had been partitioned --- this acre for sweet potatoes, that one for corn, a third beyond it for squash...
READ IT IF:

  1. You liked the first books in the series.
  2. You like dystopian YA books.
  3. You are looking for a YA action-adventure book with Christian elements.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Review: Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains? by Janet S. Crown


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Where Do the Animals Go When It Rains? was conceptualized after years of imaginary story telling every night at bedtime. Picking an animal together, the author would tuck her children into bed and create a story where the animals lived and what their world was like all through a child s eye. Since most animals live outside, Janet and her kids would make up rhymes about their surroundings and what happens to the animals when it would rain. The end result is her beautifully crafted book with illustrations by Daron Rosenberg. Where Do the Animals Go When It Rains? explores the following themes: 1. The myriad of weather and the effects on animals with climate change 2. Imagination has no boundaries 3. Reading with children is the best commonality and connector for all ages 4. Learning about animals from all over the world 5. Bonding time with child/parent "The book was created with my kids as a bedtime story based on their curiosities about animals what happens to them during certain weather conditions," says Crown. "I wanted the illustrations to be comforting, fun and engaging while inviting questions and thought."
MY TAKE:
This book is the perfect read for a rainy day.

In Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains?, kids get to learn about where some animals go when it rains.

The premise is okay. It's not really something that you tend to think about, because I guess most people just assume that animals take shelter when it rains but don't really go so far as too think about where exactly they take shelter. I think I enjoyed it a bit more than I normally would have, since when I started reading this it started raining here at home.

I don't know how accurate this book is, but it still makes for a good story even if it isn't all that true.

Thanks to NetGalley and Smith Publicity for the e-copy.

THE GOOD:

  1. It helps kids visualize where animals go when it rains.
  2. It's a nice book to read while stuck at home because of the rain.
  3. Proceeds go to The Painted Turtle (www.paintedturtle.org).

THE BAD:

  1. The illustration and coloring style might not appeal to everyone.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:

The squirrel scampers up
a big oak tree,
looking frantically for a branch
large enough to protect
his entire family.

READ IT IF:

  1. Your child is curious about nature.
  2. You want to help The Painted Turtle organization.
  3. You are looking for a rainy day read for your kids.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Review: Cuddle by Elizabeth Verdick, Marjorie Lisovskis


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

With soothing photographs and gentle, rhythmic language, this book depicts the many loving connections that come from touch. Rock, baby, rock. Tender as can be. Snuggle, baby, snuggle. Rest your head on me. Babies and grown-ups will love the warm-and-cozy images of babies snuggling up to blankets, stuffed animals, pets, and people.
Happy Healthy Baby series
What can baby do today? Move . . . and reach, play, eat, cuddle, and rest. Busy babies grow healthy and strong as they move about, discovering the many things they can do! Appealing photographs and whimsical illustrations capture the moments and moods of baby’s day; rhythm and rhyme hold baby’s attention. As the books are shared with them, babies absorb concepts of love, safety, and confidence. These sturdy-format books reflect what every parent wants: a happy, healthy baby. A perfect gift for baby showers, newborns, and birthdays.

MY TAKE:
Just like the other book from the same series, which I reviewed recently, this book is a nice book for babies and their new parents to read together.

In Cuddle, you get to read and see about the different ways that babies, and their parents, cuddle each other (smooch, hug, etc.). The rhymes are accompanied by simple yet colorful illustrations, as well as pictures of cute babies.

I enjoyed this book more than Move, the other book that I reviewed from this series. I think it's partly because of the blue background of the illustrations in this book, and because I really like cuddling cute babies.

In terms of cuteness factor, though, this book and Move have equally attractive illustrations and pictures. Also, like Move, this book has helpful tips for new parents.

Thanks to NetGalley and Free Spirit Publishing for the e-copy.

THE GOOD:

  1. The illustrations can help babies follow along when the book is being read to them.
  2. The pictures of the babies are sweet.
  3. The tips near the end of the book are very helpful.

THE BAD:

  1. The pictures don't always match the rhymes.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:

Come closer, baby ...
let's cuddle.

READ IT IF:

  1. You are a new parent.
  2. You like babies.
  3. You are looking for a book to read to your baby.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The squirrel scampers up
a big oak tree,
looking frantically for a branch
large enough to protect his
entire family.
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, April 22, 2013

Review: Move by Elizabeth Verdick, Marjorie Lisovskis


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Amazing babies are on the move in this lively board book that celebrates all the joyful ways babies propel themselves and interact with the world. Push, baby, push! Look how strong you are. Climb, baby, climb! You are going far. Babies, parents, and care providers will all enjoy this bouncy, spirited book.
Happy Healthy Baby series
What can baby do today? Move . . . and reach, play, eat, cuddle, and rest. Busy babies grow healthy and strong as they move about, discovering the many things they can do! Appealing photographs and whimsical illustrations capture the moments and moods of baby’s day; rhythm and rhyme hold baby’s attention. As the books are shared with them, babies absorb concepts of love, safety, and confidence. These sturdy-format books reflect what every parent wants: a happy, healthy baby. A perfect gift for baby showers, newborns, and birthdays.

MY TAKE:
If you have a new baby in the house, you might be interested in this book.

In Move, rhymes about the different ways that babies can move (push, scoot, etc.) are paired with cute, simple illustrations and pictures of babies. There are also movement tips at the end of the book for parents to read through.

This is a nice book to read to your baby, even if they might not quite understand what the words mean yet. At the very least, they'll be entertained by the pictures of the babies and they may get the context of the words based on the drawings.

The tips at the end are actually pretty useful for young parents, so there's something for the parents here too after they finish reading to their kids.

Thanks to NetGalley and Free Spirit Publishing for the e-copy.

THE GOOD:

  1. The illustrations are cute and help show what the words mean to the baby.
  2. The babies in the photographs are adorable.
  3. The tips at the end are helpful for new parents.

THE BAD:

  1. The photos don't always match the rhymes.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Scoot, baby, scoot!
READ IT IF:

  1. You are a new parent.
  2. You are looking for a book to read to your baby.
  3. You like looking at pictures of babies.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, April 21, 2013

In My Mailbox



In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:




Always Daddy's Princess by Karen Kingsbury
Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains? by Janet S. Crown
Storm by Evan Angler
Move by Elizabeth Verdick, Marjorie Lisovskis
Cuddle by Elizabeth Verdick, Marjorie Lisovskis
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, April 20, 2013

Review: Always Daddy's Princess by Karen Kingsbury


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Blow the trumpet, sound the horn, Daddy's princess has been born! The timeless journey of a daughter and father is poignantly captured in the story of a girl's growth from childhood to motherhood. Playful, emotive prose, enriched by the whisper of God's scripture on each beautifully illustrated page, invites girls and dads to see themselves reflected in this keepsake book and to be reminded of the blessings and the bonds between them. Throughout tea parties, soccer games, braces, and boys, a girl is her daddy's princess every step of the way.
MY TAKE:
I'm a daddy's girl so I thought this would be a fun read.

In Always Daddy's Princess, we get to see the story of a father's love for his daughter over the years.

The story is told in rhymes and the colorful pictures help tell the story wonderfully. Given that it is told in rhymes, it makes me think that the target audience is quite young, maybe 7 years old and below, so I'm not sure if they'll be completely able to grasp the ideas in the latter half of the story, wherein the girl herself is all grown up and has a child of her own. However, it still makes for a good read, and I think parents, especially fathers, will be able to relate very well to this book. I wouldn't be surprised if some fathers get a little emotional when they read this book to their young daughters.

Thanks to NetGalley and Zonderkidz for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. The illustrations are very cute and girly.
  2. It shows the love a father has for his child all throughout her life.
  3. There are relevant bible verses printed in small font for each set of rhymes.

THE BAD:

  1. Really young kids might not be able to fully appreciate the message of the story.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:

College takes her far from home.
Then, travel: London, Paris, Rome...

READ IT IF:

  1. You're a daddy's girl.
  2. You're looking for a book your husband can read to your daughter.
  3. You're looking for a sweet book about father-daughter relationships.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Friday, April 19, 2013

Review: The Rose Throne by Mette Ivie Harrison


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Richly-imagined fantasy romance from the author of Princess and the Hound, a tale of two princesses--one with magic, one with none--who dare seek love in a world where real choice can never be theirs. For fans of Megan Whalen Turner, Catherine Fisher, and Cassandra Clare.
Ailsbet loves nothing more than music; tall and red-haired, she's impatient with the artifice and ceremony of her father's court. Marissa adores the world of her island home and feels she has much to offer when she finally inherits the throne from her wise, good-tempered father. The trouble is that neither princess has the power--or the magic--to rule alone, and if the kingdoms can be united, which princess will end up ruling the joint land? For both, the only goal would seem to be a strategic marriage to a man who can bring his own brand of power to the throne. But will either girl be able to marry for love? And can either of these two princesses, rivals though they have never met, afford to let the other live?

MY TAKE:
I found the first part of this book quite boring, but it's a good thing I continued reading because the second half of the book got quite interesting.

In The Rose Throne, the focus is on two princesses from neighboring kingdoms and a prophecy which could unite their kingdoms for the benefit of all. However, things aren't quite as simple as they seem, as people's loyalties and alliances are easily shifted.

The setting, elements and the overall vibe of the book reminded me of Tamora Pierce's novels. I'm a huge fan of Tamora Pierce's Song of the Lioness and Protector of the Small quartets so any book that I read that reminds me of them tends to get compared to these books. Unfortunately, the first half of The Rose Throne did not excite me at all. It didn't help, I guess, that I didn't really like Ailsbet or Issa. Issa felt like a typical naive princess to me and while she showed her powers at the end, by then, I was so not interested in her that I felt no awe or cared what happened to her. Ailsbet, on the other hand, I didn't like at first but as the novel wore on, it was easier to understand her and I liked that she wasn't so preoccupied with boys and her storyline seems to be promising in terms of the future books in the series.

Thanks to NetGalley and EgmontUSA for the e-ARC. Publication date of The Rose Throne is on May 14, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. The book gets better as you get deeper into it.
  2. The worldbuilding is promising.
  3. There are some interesting characters.

THE BAD:

  1. Some may find the first chapters boring.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
The feast took four hours from beginning to end, though Issa could only take small bites of the most delicate dishes, roasted fish and poached eggs or fruit compotes.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like fantasy books with forbidden romance.
  2. You like unfeminine heroines.
  3. You liked Tamora Pierce's books but want a little more romance than the books had.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Review: Uncle John's Smell-O-Scopic Bathroom Reader For Kids Only! by Bathroom Readers' Institute


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

It’s wacky and fun! It’s easy to read! It’s a whole new twist on learning! And it’s FOR KIDS ONLY--boys, girls, kids who like to read, kids who don’t, kids with noses, nosey kids, kids who pick their noses…even grown up kids. Anyone who opens Uncle John’s Smell-O-Scopic Bathroom Reader will find page after page of fascinating facts and tantalizing true stories about science, history, pop culture, sports, amazing kids, goofy grownups, and (hold your noses…) disgustingly smelly things!
Part of the Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader FOR KIDS ONLY series, this illustrated edition features such topics as
* The World’s Smelliest Ghosts
* The Founding Father who Farted Proudly
* A Mama Mutt that Adopted a Human Baby
* South Africa’s Snake Girl
* The Abominable Crustacean
* Cleopatra’s Beauty Tips
* An Artist Who Sculpts with Toenail Clippings,
Plus…riddles and jokes, quotes and quizzes, brainteasers, word-origins, and much, much more!
Uncle John’s Smell-O-Scopic Bathroom Reader includes story lengths to fit any attention span (or accommodate any duration of Throne Time)--“short” (one page), “medium” (two pages), and “long” (three to five pages)--and they’re all fun, informative, and educational. Warning: If you drink milk while reading this book, it may come out of your nose.

MY TAKE:
There aren't a lot of trivia books out there for kids that are as big as this one.

In Uncle John's Smell-O-Scopic Bathroom Reader For Kids Only!, kids learn all sorts of trivia about anything under the sun. It also has tons of activities that they can do if they get tired of reading.

Since this book is meant for bathroom reading, the articles come in different lengths, namely short, medium and long. I'm not sure if a lot of kids read while they're on the toilet, but even if they didn't, they could always bring this along when they're going somewhere and they can read bits and pieces of it while waiting or when they're on their way somewhere.

If you're familiar with the other Bathroom Reader books, then you already have an idea how the content and layout of this book is. If you aren't familiar, though, I think the most important thing to not is that there aren't a lot of pictures here, so if your kid prefers books with lots of pictures, this one might bore him or her.

Thanks to NetGalley and Portable Press for the e-ARC.

THE GOOD:

  1. It covers a wide range of topics.
  2. The tone is very conversational.
  3. There are activities for kids to do.

THE BAD:

  1. There are only a few pictures in the book.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
In a hurry? Studies show you make faster decisions if you have to pee.
READ IT IF:

  1. Your child likes trivia books.
  2. You want your child to read more but he or she has a short attention span.
  3. Your kid gets bored easily.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Review: So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Started in the World of Culinary Arts by Jane Bedell


SUMMARY FROM BEYONDWORD.COM:

Whet your appetite with this step-by-step guide to becoming a culinarian.

Put on your chef’s coat and leap into the world of food! From running your own kitchen to writing a food blog to inventing new recipes and even learning about molecular gastronomy, So, You Want to Be a Chef? unveils everything you need to know to break into the culinary arts.

MY TAKE:
I watch pretty much every cooking-related TV reality show, so I've become quite interested in cooking and anything related to it.

In So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Started in the World of Culinary Arts, kids can learn all about the different positions in the restaurant world, from chefs to restaurant owners to writers.

It's too bad this book wasn't around when I was a kid. This book contains a lot of really good information and since it covers almost all parts of the cooking industry, kids can learn about the different careers and help narrow down which careers they are interested in.

There are also interviews with top chefs and personalities, who have achieved a great deal of success in their careers, and kids who are starting to make their mark in the food world. I thought the features on the kids were a nice touch as it could help kids be inspired since it shows that it is possible for kids to be able to do a lot in the industry already.

Thanks to NetGalley and Aladdin/Beyond Words for the e-ARC. Publication date of So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Started in the World of Culinary Arts is on October 22, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. Its comprehensive.
  2. There are interviews with famous chefs and kids who have found success in the industry.
  3. Kids can learn a lot more about the industry.

THE BAD:

  1. There aren't a lot of pictures and illustrations.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Do you ever wonder how they get it to look so natural, perfect, and delicious?
READ IT IF:

  1. Your kid is interested in a food-related career.
  2. You are fascinated with food.
  3. You are curious about the food industry.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

In the morning, King Haikor sent a message to Ailsbet announcing that she would go to the south for the summer to visit Baron Bartel of Terrik on the coast of Hewell as her reward for her performance on the flute.

Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Review: The Emerald Ring (Cleopatra's Legacy) by Dorine White


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Sara Bogus’s life turns upside down when she discovers an emerald ring that once belonged to Cleopatra. The fun of discovering the ring’s unique abilities turns to fear when she finds out a dangerous cult bent on restoring Rome to power is after the ring. Forced to choose between keeping the ring and saving her friends, Sara learns the price of bravery in this electrifying read! 
MY TAKE:
Mystery thrillers in the vein of National Treasure have always been my kind of thing, so I decided to give this one a try.

In The Emerald Ring, Sara finds an emerald ring that has special powers. As it turns out, however, someone is after the ring and will stop at nothing to get it.

I wasn't quite sure how I felt about this book. I guess, I was mostly disappointed because there's so much potential here. The idea of different artifacts being imbued with magical powers isn't new, but the addition of a secondary character who is after another artifact helped bring something different to the story.

I guess this is the kind of book that would benefit from being expanded upon. It feels a little bit incomplete somehow. Perhaps if there were more information on the cult or maybe if the build up was slower or something, it would have been better for me. I never actually felt any connection with Sara. Occasionally, she would annoy me, but for the most part, I was reading just to see how the story would go. I was actually more interested in the secondary characters, their personalities and stories.

It was also too bad that my ARC had a number of punctuation errors, so it took me awhile to get into the rhythm. Hopefully, all the typos and errors will be fixed in the final copy.

Thanks to NetGalley and Sweetwater for the e-ARC. Publication date of The Emerald Ring is on May 14, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. The plot has a lot of potential.
  2. The secondary characters are interesting.
  3. There are some interesting moments here.

THE BAD:

  1. Sara might not be relateable or interesting to everyone.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
There, upon Cleopatra's neck, rested a golden necklace with five different gemstones; a ruby, a diamond, a onyx, a sapphire, and last, a sparkling green emerald.
READ IT IF:

  1. You enjoy mysteries about magical artifacts.
  2. You like cats.
  3. You are fascinated with Egypt and Cleopatra.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

In My Mailbox



In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:




So, You Want to Be a Chef? How to Get Started in the World of Culinary Arts by Jane Bedell
Uncle John's Smell-O-Scopic Bathroom Reader For Kids Only! by
Bathroom Readers' Institute
The Rose Throne by Mette Ivie Harrison
Twerp by Mark Goldblatt
Game On by Monica Seles and James LaRosa
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Review: Sesame Street: I Is For Imagination by Amy Mebberson


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Sunny Day!
Chase the clouds away with Sesame Street: I Is For Imagination as Sesame Street, the most beloved and long-running children's property, comes to comics for the FIRST TIME!
Join Elmo, Big Bird, Grover, Bert & Ernie, Cookie Monster, and all of your favorites in this special volume featuring art by Amy Mebberson (The Muppet Show, Strawberry Shortcake), James Silvani (Muppet King Arthur, Darkwing Duck), and more!

MY TAKE:
My favorite Sesame Street character is Elmo, so obviously I enjoyed this comic book a lot.

In Sesame Street: I is for imagination, we are treated to a collection of stories featuring the different Sesame Street characters. Some of the stories include It's Super Elmo, featuring Elmo and Grover, A Dip in the Galaxy, which stars Cookie Monster, and Smog Day Afternoon, starring Oscar the Grouch.

The best story, in my biased opinion, is It's Super Elmo. In the story, Elmo wishes to be superhero but doesn't have any superpowers. Grover helps him see that he doesn't need superpowers to be a hero. It's a wonderful story that will speak to little kids and their fantasies.

Thanks to NetGalley and Ape Entertainment for the e-ARC. Publication date of Sesame Street: I is for imagination is on May 7, 2013.

THE GOOD:

  1. It features your favorite Sesame Street characters.
  2. It's a good complement to Sesame Street episodes.
  3. The stories are entertaining.

THE BAD:

  1. The stories might be too short for older kids.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
And Elmo is cute, too!
READ IT IF:

  1. You or your child like Sesame Street.
  2. Your child likes comic books.
  3. You want to encourage your child to read more.

RATING:
Photobucket

SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...