Friday, August 31, 2012

Review: Bodyguards! by Ed Butts


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Meet the heroes, villains, and bunglers hired to protect others.
We might think of bodyguards as a modern concept, but they've been around since ancient times. The rich, the powerful, the famous, and the infamous have all placed their safety in the hands of bodyguards. From Caesar's Praetorian Guard to Japanese samurai warriors to Wild West outlaws, bodyguards have played a vital role. They've even changed the course of history.
There are notorious bodyguards who protect gangsters from the police and those who are paid to shield celebrities from the paparazzi, while others escort children in danger of being kidnapped. In BODYGUARDS! you'll meet both heroes (like the quick-thinking guard whose spear saved the life of Alexander the Great) and villains (like the elite Hitler Bodyguard, later tried as war criminals), and even some bodyguards who have failed in their job to protect.
Brimming with vibrant action-packed illustrations in graphic-novel style, BODYGUARDS! opens the window on the fascinating stories of those entrusted to protect people's lives.

MY TAKE:

For kids and adults who are fascinated with kick-ass historical figures and warrior classes, this book is the perfect weekend read.

Bodyguards! discusses the different bodyguard and warrior types in history. There are also stories about the heroics of warriors such as Sempronius Densus, a Praetorian Guard who stayed loyal to emperor Galba even when the other bodyguards turned against Galba.

I liked the way the book was structured. There are plenty of encyclopedia type facts, but the stories, which are sometimes illustrated in comic strip form, make it more interesting and breaks the monotony of facts, facts, facts. While most of the groups of warriors/bodyguards are already familiar to me (ninja, samurai, etc.), most of the stories regarding great warriors for each bodyguard type are stories that I haven't really heard before. This is great because I certainly don't want to read a book wherein I don't learn something.


Thanks to NetGalley and Annick Press for the e-ARC. Publication date of Bodyguards! is on September 1, 2012.


THE GOOD:

  1. It covers all types of bodyguards from the past and present and from different countries around the world.
  2. There are anecdotes about notable battles and bodyguards.
  3. There's a chapter that details what you might need to know if you want to be a bodyguard.

THE BAD:

  1. The illustration style might not be everyone's cup of tea.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
An international academy called ATHENA trains women to be bodyguards.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like reading about warriors.
  2. You're a history buff.
  3. You like reading trivia books.

RATING:
 Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Review: Facial Features by Jennifer Boothroyd


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
What facial features do you have? Freckles are a common feature. So are turned-up noses and unattached earlobes. What determines your facial features? Read this book to find out!
MY TAKE:

I'm all for children's books that are educational.

Facial Features are about facial features, obviously, and how these traits are passed down. Instead of drawings, this book makes use of colored photographs, which give it a more grown-up feel.

I like that this book isn't dumbed down. The author uses words like genes and alleles. I imagine this book will be great for first to third graders.

I also liked the fact that the photographs picture kids and adults from different races. This makes the appeal to a larger and possibly worldwide audience.

Thanks to NetGalley and Lerner Publications for the e-ARC. Publication date of Facial Features is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. Kids and adults featured in the pictures are from different races.
  2. It isn't dumbed down.
  3. It's very colorful.

THE BAD:

  1. The font and the layout would have been better if it were more scrapbook-like.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
This ear's pointed tip is called Darwin's ear point.
READ IT IF:

  1. You have a kid who likes biology.
  2. Your kid likes learning.
  3. You want your kids to read more educational books.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Review: S.A.V.E. Squad Series Book 2: The Great Cat Caper by Lauraine Snelling and Kathleen Wright



SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
No, she’s not like those dumpster cats that strange lady feeds outside the Community Center. Is she? . . . Since Vee’s not sure where she belongs in her newly blended family, she must keep her spot as the smartest Squadder and her secret. But that’s threatened even as the cats are threatened. The S.A.V.E. Squad schemes to rescue the cats and turn them into perfect pets for The Great Cat Caper Adoption. Finding out who they are is as much a struggle for Vee as for the cats. Will the cats be perfect pets by the time Everything Animal TV show arrives? And will Vee trust the Squad with her secret?
MY TAKE:

I enjoyed the first S.A.V.E squad book, but I liked this one a little bit better because I like Vee.

In S.A.V.E. Squad Series Book 2: The Great Cat Caper, the S.A.V.E. Squad, particularly Vee, turn their attention to saving a group of cats. Vee, who is the focus of this book, is also dealing with problems regarding her place in an advanced school and in her two families, one with her dad and stepmom and the other with her mom and stepdad.

What I like about the S.A.V.E. Squad books is how religion is brought into the story. It's there, but not so prominent that those who are not particularly religious or spiritual will be turned off.

The mystery in this book isn't as exciting as the first book. This book is more about finding your place in the world and in God. In that, it succeeds. The book ends quite happily and somewhat unbelievably, but these books are meant to work out that way as it does spread positive messages.

Thanks to NetGalley and Barbour Books for the e-ARC. Publication date of S.A.V.E. Squad Series Book 2: The Great Cat Caper is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. Vee is relateable.
  2. Religion and God are present but not forced.
  3. It has nice lessons.

THE BAD:

  1. Their problems are solved quite easily.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
"Thank you, Lord, for the food we are about to eat. Help us find our place in You in every moment."
READ IT IF:

  1. You like cats.
  2. Your child likes books about group of friends who go on adventures.
  3. You or your child like Christian kids books.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!
No, they don't taste good when dipped in butter, but these little clasps are the perfect way to keep your necklaces and bracelets securely attached to your neck and wrists.
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, August 27, 2012

Review: Lulu and the Duck in the Park by Hilary McKay


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Lulu loves animals. When Lulu finds a duck egg that has rolled out of its nest, she takes it to class to keep it safe. Lulu isn't allowed to bring pets to school. But she's not really breaking the rules because it's just an egg. Surely nothing bad will happen. . .
A fun-filled new series for early readers and animal lovers alike.
For kids ages 7-10

MY TAKE:

I've never had a pet, but I do like most animals. If you're a really big animal lover, you will love this book.

In Lulu and the Duck in the Park, Lulu adopts a duck egg after she finds it alone in its nest. Of course, things get complicated when she brings it back to school.

It's a cute, simple story. It's predictable but it's a feel-good story that kids will like. If you're a fan of books like The Boxcar Children, this book has a similar vibe. It's probably because of the illustrations, but it could also be because of the overall tone of the book.

Lulu is a nice kid. I can't imagine that there are a lot of kids whose parents would let them keep so many animals, though. :P

Thanks to NetGalley and Albert Whitman and Company for the e-ARC. Publication date of Lulu and the Duck in the Park is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It will encourage kids who love animals.
  2. It promotes the proper treatment of animals.
  3. It's a feel-good story.

THE BAD:

  1. Some people may find the book boring.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
That was what Mrs. Holiday, who had been brought up in Scotland, called the cookie-ish, appley, peanut-butter-sandwichy snack that came after swimming.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like Dr. Doolittle.
  2. You like animals.
  3. You like children's books with an old-school vibe.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

In My Mailbox



In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:





Aldo's Fantastical Movie Palace by Jonathan Friesen
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Review: Lead With a Story by Paul Smith


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

"Paul Smith is scary smart, an amazing storyteller." --Chip Heath, Author Made to Stick
Storytelling has come of age in the business world. Today, many of the most successful companies use storytelling as a leadership tool. At Nike, all senior executives are designated “corporate storytellers.” 3M banned bullet points years ago and replaced them with a process of writing “strategic narratives.” Procter & Gamble hired Hollywood directors to teach its executives storytelling techniques. Some forward-thinking business schools have even added storytelling courses to their management curriculum.
The reason for this is simple: Stories have the ability to engage an audience the way logic and bullet points alone never could. Whether you are trying to communicate a vision, sell an idea, or inspire commitment, storytelling is a powerful business tool that can mean the difference between mediocre results and phenomenal success.
Lead with a Story contains both ready-to-use stories and how-to guidance for readers looking to craft their own. Designed for a wide variety of business challenges, the book shows how narrative can help: Define culture and values • Engender creativity and innovation • Foster collaboration and build relationships • Provide coaching and feedback • Lead change • And more.

Whether in a speech or a memo, communicated to one person or a thousand, storytelling is an essential skill for success. Complete with examples from companies like Kellogg's, Merrill-Lynch, Procter & Gamble, National Car Rental, Wal-Mart, Pizza Hut, and more, this practical resource gives readers the guidance they need to deliver stories to stunning effect.

MY TAKE:

This is probably the first book I've reviewed that I wanted to buy and give to someone as an gift.

Lead with a Story is basically a guide on how to become a more effective storyteller and integrate it into your work.

This book is perfect for managers and those who want to get to that level in the future. That's because this is more than just about storytelling. It's about communicating, encouraging and inspiring others.

The stories featured in the book are very interesting and thought-provoking. They are the kind of stories you would want to share with others. I don't know if this would work in my company since it's a very traditional corporation, but the senior managers will probably make this work.

Thanks to NetGalley and AMACOM for the e-ARC. Publication date of Lead With a Story is on August 30, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It's interesting and very useful.
  2. There are exercises at the end of each chapter.
  3. There's a workbook of sorts at the end.

THE BAD:

  1. It can get boring by the end if you read it in one sitting.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Stories inspire. Slides don't.
READ IT IF:

  1. You're a manager or would like to be one someday.
  2. You want to be a more effective storyteller.
  3.  You like stories.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Friday, August 24, 2012

Review: Potatoes on Rooftops by Hadley Dyer


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

All around the world, people are farming in the concrete jungle!
The urban farming movement is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance. Now it's time for kids to be a part of it, too! With a minimum of equipment and whether alone or with friends, kids can start growing fruit and vegetables at home, in a community garden, or at school.
Combining practical tips and well-researched facts, POTATOES ON ROOFTOPS is a brisk and informative overview of the how and why of the movement toward small-scale urban farming. There are many ways to farm in the city: a Detroit high school program teaches students to grow food and raise chickens; in Tokyo, a bank vault was converted into an underground greenhouse; in Nairobi, local youth transformed part of a slum into a garden that helps feed their families; First Lady Michelle Obama established an organic garden at the White House; and more in other countries.
Short, kid-friendly descriptions and vibrant photos and illustrations keep the pace moving and the tone light. Toronto Public Health and FoodShare, two respected agencies, both have contributed to the book. A perfect book to get kids thinking about alternative ways of growing and getting food.

MY TAKE:

When I was a kid, I used to like gardening. I planted a papaya tree and a calamansi tree, but when I grew up, I had less and less time to spend on gardening.

Potatoes on Rooftops is a beginner's guide for kids and adults on how to grow fruits, vegetables and even raise animals for food.

I don't know a lot of people here in Manila who grow vegetables in their own gardens. My uncle grows vegetables but he does it more for the exercise than for the vegetables themselves. I decided to read this book as I had been meaning to start planting again but wasn't sure how to go about it again.

This book offers up some really great tips that beginner gardeners can use. It's also very informative with lots of facts and details about different concepts related to growing food. There's also some nice quotes that relate to plants and gardening.

Thanks to NetGalley and Annick Press for the e-ARC. Publication date of Potatoes on Rooftops is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It's a good beginner gardening book for middle school kids and older kids.
  2. Adults can also learn a thing or two about gardening.
  3. There are examples from all over the world.

THE BAD:

  1. It might not be easy for younger kids to understand on their own.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
A "food mile" refers to the distance your food has traveled from the farm to your plate.
READ IT IF:

  1. You would like to learn more about gardening.
  2. You want to try and grow food in an urban environment.
  3. You are curious about growing food.

RATING: 
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?






Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Review: Mud Puddle by Robert Munsch


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

A brand-new look for a classic story.
First published in 1979, this was the first of Robert Munsch's oral stories to be turned into a book. Since then, it has made countless children (and adults) all around the world laugh out loud.
When Jule Ann goes outside, a mud puddle jumps on her and gets her dirty all over. No sooner does her mother scrub her clean than she ventures out again, only to be pounced upon by the pesky mud puddle. The cycle continues until finally Jule Ann gets the better of the mud puddle with cheerful ingenuity and two bars of smelly yellow soap.
Lively, clever artwork by award-winning illustrator DuĊĦan Petricic gives this bestselling picture book a fresh and energetic look that will charm a new generation of young readers.

MY TAKE:

I've never heard about this book until I saw it on NetGalley.

Mud Puddle is the story of Jule Ann who just keeps getting splashed by a mud puddle. The mud puddle seems to be alive and comes out of nowhere just to get Jule Ann dirty.

I found the concept a little odd, but I then imagined it as something that Jule Ann would tell her mother to explain why she keeps getting muddy.

I particularly liked the illustrations as the coloring is gorgeous and the style has an old-timey feel.

Thanks to NetGalley and Annick Press for the e-ARC. Publication date of Mud Puddle is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. The coloring is beautiful.
  2. Jule Ann is a cute kid.
  3. The writing style is nice and kid-friendly.

THE BAD:

  1. The idea of the living mud puddle might not appeal to everyone.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Then she walked outside and sat down under the apple tree.
READ IT IF:

  1. Your kid likes to get messy.
  2. Your child likes jumping in the mud.
  3. Your child has a wonderful imagination.

RATING: 
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Review: The Fire Station by Robert Munsch


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Bestselling Munsch classic now available as a board book.
What child wouldn't love to go for a ride on a fire truck? In this all-time favorite, two kids visit a fire station. While they are exploring a fire truck, an alarm sounds, and away they go to the rescue! In his inimitable way, Munsch turns the story into a hilarious romp that ends with the kids in the bath after helping to battle a fire that turned them all kinds of crazy colors.
Now available with a simplified, revised text in a toddler-friendly board book edition, this story will delight very young children discovering it for the first time.

MY TAKE:

This isn't one of the best children's books I've ever read, but it's still a cute concept.

In The Fire Station, Shiela and Michael go exploring in a fire station and find themselves on a rather exciting adventure.

The narration is a little bit long so it seems to be geared to a slightly older group of young kids. The illustration and coloring seem a bit old-fashioned, as though you were reading an old storybook. The story is still nice, though, and I thought the ending was pretty funny. 

Thanks to NetGalley and Annick Press for the e-ARC. Publication date of The Fire Station is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. The concept is interesting and something kids might actually do.
  2. It's funny.
  3. The characters are endearing.

THE BAD:

  1. It might seem a little too old-fashioned for some.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Yucky smoke colored Michael yellow, green and blue.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like classic stories.
  2. You like books wherein the kids go on adventures.
  3. You like funny heroes.

RATING: 
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!
There was no school for two days, so most everyone stayed inside, listening to the wind and ice pellets on the windows and roof.
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Monday, August 20, 2012

Review: The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy by Nikki Loftin


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

A deliciously spooky middle-grade debut that's Coraline meets Hansel and Gretel
Lorelei is bowled over by Splendid Academy--Principal Trapp encourages the students to run in the hallways, the classrooms are stocked with candy dishes, and the cafeteria serves lavish meals featuring all Lorelei's favorite foods. But the more time she spends at school, the more suspicious she becomes. Why are her classmates growing so chubby? And why do the teachers seem so sinister?
It's up to Lorelei and her new friend Andrew to figure out what secret this supposedly splendid school is hiding. What they discover chills their bones--and might even pick them clean!
Mix one part magic, one part mystery, and just a dash of Grimm, and you've got the recipe for a cozy-creepy read that kids will gobble up like candy.

MY TAKE:

Fairytale adaptations, when done right, can be very interesting. This book is definitely done right.

As the summary suggests, this book is sort of a retelling of Hansel and Gretel. Lorelei and her schoolmates are enamored with Splendid Academy. All their favorite foods are served to them at breakfast and lunch and they gorge themselves on candy in between. Something doesn't feel right to Lorelei, however, and she's determined to find out.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. From the get-go, since I knew this was a Hansel and Gretel book, I kinda knew how the story was going to go. However, there were enough new elements in this book to make it less   derivative.

Lorelei is usually a pleasant character, although there are moments wherein she was extremely dense. The other characters were alright, though, I didn't really feel a connection with them.

Thanks to NetGalley and Razorbill for the e-ARC. Publication date of The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy is on August 21, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It's a nice take on an old story.
  2. It's whimsical.
  3. It's well-written.

THE BAD:

  1. You might not find some of the characters easy to like.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Pasta with rich tomato sauce, fried chicken that smelled the same as my grandma's, mashed potatoes, carrot coins swimming in honey sauce, and white rolls so fluffy they reminded me of clouds.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like fairy tales.
  2. You like food.
  3. You like retellings of classic stories.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?





Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Sunday, August 19, 2012

In My Mailbox



In My Mailbox is a weekly meme hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren.

FROM NETGALLEY:







Bodyguards! by Ed Butts
The Fire Station by Robert Munsch
The Boy Who Made it Rain by Brian Conaghan
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Saturday, August 18, 2012

Review: Love Slave by Jennifer Spiegel


SUMMARY FROM GOODREADS.COM:
It's 1995. When she can, Sybil Weatherfield works as an office temp. But in her jobless hours she may be her generation's Dorothy Parker, writing a confessional column for the alternative weekly, New York Shock. Her friends include a paperpusher for a human rights organization and the lead singer of a local rock band called Glass Half Empty. Together they try to find a path from their own wry inactivity to something real and lasting that can matter to them. Richly funny and wincingly specific, this cunning debut novel is a bittersweet and ironic look at what it means to be enthralled by an idea - by even the most ragged possibility of love.
MY TAKE:

The main reason why I requested this book was because the blurb reminded me so much of the movie Reality Bites. After reading the book, well, I'd say I got it right.

In Love Slave, writer Sybil Weatherfield is coping with New York and its intricacies. Adding some color to her New York experience are her friends who are struggling or making it in New York.

I was surprised that Sybil was already in her thirties. She sounded a little bit like she was younger, maybe in her mid-20s. She writes a column for a New York paper and her column is very... self-centered. Her column is spaced like a poem and at first, it was okay, but after awhile, it became clear to me that Sybil's columns were just not my cup of tea and I always skipped past those chapters. I wasn't really a fan of Sybil overall, I guess. There were times when I liked her, and she did have some nice lines, but there were times when I thought she was being pretentious or whiney.

The book is still well-written, though. There was a pervasive feeling of gloom within the book. Generation X seems like a tired, cynical generation. The mood of the entire book is perfect for what the characters go through. The thing is, other than feeling sad and kind of depressed, this book didn't really tug at my heart strings. It was just okay. I guess I'm not the target audience for this book. I do think Generation X will relate a lot to this book.

Thanks to NetGalley and Unbridled Books for the e-ARC. Publication date of Love Slave is on September 4, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It paints a realistic picture.
  2. There are some witty lines.
  3. Some Generation X people can relate to this.

THE BAD:

  1. It might not evoke as much emotion as it could have.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
"I like it here, Rob. But I'm tired. Of my own tiresomeness."
READ IT IF:

  1. You're part of Generation X.
  2. You liked Reality Bites.
  3. You want to know what it's like to really live in New York.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Friday, August 17, 2012

Review: Sneak by Evan Angler


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

In a future United States under the power of a charismatic leader, everyone gets the Mark at age thirteen. The Mark lets citizen shop, go to school, and even get medical care—but without it, you are on your own. Few refuse to get the Mark. Those who do . . . disappear.
Logan Langly went in to get his Mark, but he backed out at the last minute.  Now he’s on the run from government agents who will stop at nothing to capture him. But Logan is on a mission to find and save his sister, Lily, who disappeared five years ago on her thirteenth birthday, the day she was supposed to receive her Mark.
Logan and his friends, a group of dissenters called the Dust, discover a vast network of the Unmarked, who help them travel safely to the capital city where Lily is imprisoned. Along the way, the Dust receives some startling information from the Markless community, opening their eyes to the message of Christianity and warning that humanity is now entering the End of Days.
When the Dust finally arrives in the capital, it seems that all their careful planning is useless against a government that will do anything to bend its citizens to its will. Can the gentle words Logan has found in a tattered, banned Bible really stand against the most powerful military the world has ever known? Can Logan even sacrifice his own freedom, choosing to act through faith alone?

MY TAKE:

I really liked the first book so I was excited to start reading this book.

Sneak picks up where Swipe left off. Logan is now on the run from DOME, along with Peck and the rest of Dust. To get to Lily, they must rely on other Markless to get to Beacon. However, will they like what they find in Beacon?

I can't remember if there were any Christian references in the first book. If there was, I must have missed it. In Sneak, however, the references are easy to spot. Aside from quotes from the Bible, symbols like the fish also figure prominently.

What I like about this book is that the plot is well thought-out. There are some obvious plot twists, but there are also some unexpected plot twists that bring a little excitement to the book. Compared to the first book, this book was more about their journey to find Lily and less about finding out who is the real enemy. We get to learn more about the Markless as well. As it turns out, they are somewhat like the early Christians and DOME is like the Romans. You'll understand when you read the book.

Thanks to NetGalley and Tommy Nelson for the e-ARC. Publication date is on September 4, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. It has Christian elements but doesn't become a preachy book.
  2. The storyline is interesting.
  3. You learn more about the world wherein the book takes place.

THE BAD:

  1. There were some predictable plot twists.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:

Please, Logan thought, thinking of the strong and loving God in his tattered book. Give me strength now. I am tempted. I want to give in. I am so tempted.Do not let me.Do not let me give in.

READ IT IF:

  1. You liked the first book.
  2. You like adventure books.
  3. You are looking for a book that has Christian elements.

RATING:
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Review: The Boxcar Children Beginning by Patricia MacLachlan


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:

Before they were the Boxcar Children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny Alden lived with their parents at Fair Meadow Farm.
Although times are hard, the Aldens are happy--"the best family of all," Mama likes to say. One day, a blizzard hits the countryside, and a car is stranded on the road near their farm. The family in the car needs shelter, and when the Aldens take them in, the strangers soon become friends. But things never stay the same at Fair Meadow Farm, and the spring and summer bring events that will forever change the lives of the Alden Children.
Newbery Award-winning author Patricia MacLaclan pays loving tribute to the classic novel by Gertrude Chandler Warner in this story of the Alden children's origins and the challenges they faced before their boxcar adventures.
For kids ages 7-10.

MY TAKE:

I really liked the first The Boxcar Children book so I was eager to review this one.

The Boxcar Children Beginning is a prequel to the Boxcar Children series. Here, we get to see what the kids' lives were like prior to finding themselves living in a boxcar.

The kids are as charming as ever. Little Benny is still the sweetest and most charming character for me. Aside from the kids, the whole atmosphere described in the book makes it a worthwhile read. This is a place and a time when life was very simple. The writing evokes this. Some may find this style simplistic and old school, but it can be very pleasant and relaxing too.

Fans of the series must read this book as it elucidates a lot of things in the first book.

Thanks to NetGalley and Open Road Media for the e-ARC. Publication date of The Boxcar Children Beginning is on September 1, 2012.

THE GOOD:

  1. You learn about the kids' background.
  2. The book can be very relaxing and make you feel nostalgic.
  3. The book is very much in the spirit of the series.

THE BAD:

  1. Some may find this a little old-school.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
"Being here is an adventure for me," said Meg.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like the series.
  2. You like "old school" books.
  3. You want to introduce your kids to a classic.

RATING:
Photobucket 


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Review: Junk-Box Jewelry by Sarah Drew


SUMMARY FROM NETGALLEY.COM:
Diamonds may be forever, but forever gets old sometimes—and whether you want to wear something cool or something classic, Junk Box Jewelry has an easy, fun, and affordable answer. This do-it-yourself guide has the ability to make any teen crafty, and the wide range of project ideas ensures that once you get started it won't be long before you'll have a huge collection of unique, eco-friendly jewelry that you can wear, give as gifts, or even sell. Learn how to make pendants out of pebbles; sew a stylish cuff using scraps of fabric; and fashion a funky charm bracelet out of extra screws, washers, and other toolbox trinkets. The easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions work for both beginner- and intermediate-level crafsters, and the book also provides stunning color illustrations, along with bonus tips on the tools you need to get started, and where to find materials. Happy junking!
MY TAKE:

My cousin and I have been planning on starting a jewelry business for awhile now but we kept putting it off. So when I saw the book, I knew I had to request to review it.

Junk-Box Jewelry walks you through creating different jewelry pieces using recycled jewelry or cheap materials. The materials and tools you need are also listed in the book.

This book is great for beginners like me. The tools needed are described so you just have to find your own. Each jewelry piece has a step-by-step guide with accompanying pictures so it should be easy to do.

Some of the pieces aren't really my style, but I did find at least a couple of pieces that I really want to try and make. This book is definitely worth a read if you like making your own jewelry.

Thanks to NetGalley and Zest Books for the e-copy.


THE GOOD:

  1. It's a great book for beginner jewelers.
  2. It makes use of recycled materials.
  3. There are some nice designs and ideas you can try.

THE BAD:

  1. Some of the designs might not work for everyone.

FAVORITE QUOTE/S:
Vintage brooches are the key to making a lot of the projects in this book super fabulous.
READ IT IF:

  1. You like designing jewelry.
  2. You like do-it-yourself projects.
  3. You want to start your own business.

RATING: 
Photobucket


SOUNDS INTERESTING?



Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers

Of course, but he doesn't have to ask me with his fake cheerful voice that he saves for children and idiots.
Photobucket

Note: This post may contain Amazon affiliate links.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...